2015’S BIGGEST HEALTH CONCERN: PORN

2015’S BIGGEST HEALTH CONCERN: PORN

 

Being healthy is a big trend these days. It seems like every week there’s a new green smoothie to try or a new type of yoga to experiment with. Every day we hear about new chemicals that can cause cancer or new exercises that get you the most weight loss results.

But what if you were unknowingly letting something unhealthy into your life every single day? What if we told you that the biggest danger to your health in 2015 wasn’t only limited to food, chemicals, or obesity?

Believe it or not, one of our generation’s biggest health issues is pornography.

So what is it about porn that causes millions of people to suffer physically, mentally, and emotionally? After all, some people believe that porn is a healthy sexual activity and a harmless matter of personal choice. We’re here to tell you that this is completely false.

Physically

Porn has numerous harmful effects on the human body, including destroying men’s ability to have real sex with a real partner. Thirty years ago, erectile dysfunction in men under the age of 35 was practically unheard of because it was generally caused by blocked blood vessels in a man’s aging body.[1] That’s no longer the case. Now, with the availability of porn, erectile dysfunction is a common problem for young men as young as 16 years old.[2] With more and more porn use, the brain begins to form new pathways to recognize what is pleasurable. What often ends up happening is that the brain becomes wired to be turned on by porn[3] and the man can no longer achieve an erection with a real partner.[4] After some time, even being turned on by porn may become difficult as some of the brain’s dopamine receptors begin to shut down as more porn and harder forms of porn are needed to get aroused.[5]

Basically, watching virtual sex can make having actual sex impossible. Not cool…and definitely not healthy.

Mentally

Depression, anxiety, and loneliness are major problems in our world today, but did you know that porn is a major cause of all three of these issues?[6] Because of porn users’ desire to keep their use a secret, their relationships ultimately suffer, leaving them lonely and vulnerable to developing other psychological problems.[7] Studies show that porn users also commonly develop body-image issues, low self-esteem, and insecurity.[8]

Emotionally

Porn takes a heavy toll on relationships. Human beings are social beings and have a need for intimacy, but porn tries to fill that need for intimacy with something fake. Not only is porn not fulfilling, it can also ruin any real intimacy-providing relationships the user has. Studies have shown that after just one exposure to pornography, men rate themselves as less in love with their partners and rate their partners as less attractive.[9] Furthermore, one study found that 56% of divorces involve at least one partner’s interest in porn.[10]

Porn portrays sex as being separate from love and relationships, all about the individual’s pleasure. In real life, this isn’t the case. According to biologist Gary Wilson, “Using porn is more than just training for the wrong sport. It’s replacing these guys’ ability to play the sport they really want to learn.”

In other words, porn kills love. It’s obvious that porn is definitely not healthy given its ability to cause erectile dysfunction and a myriad of mental and emotional problems. Porn has become a public health crisis. Millions of people are suffering from its effects. It’s time to spread the word that porn is not just a habit but a destructive behavior for all those involved.

What YOU Can Do

A lot of people don’t know the actual scientific harms of porn. SHARE this article and help to spread the facts.

Sources:

1 Robinson, M. and Wilson, G. (2011). Porn-Induced Sexual Dysfunction: A Growing Problem. Psychology Today,

July 11; Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books, 105.

2 Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books, 105.

3 Hilton, D. L. (2013). Pornography Addiction—A Supranormal Stimulus Considered in the Context of

Neuroplasticity. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology 3:20767; Angres, D. H. and Bettinardi-Angres, K.

(2008). The Disease of Addiction: Origins, Treatment, and Recovery. Disease-a-Month 54: 696–721. Doidge, N.

(2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books, 108.

4 Cera, N., Delli Pizzi, S., Di Pierro, E. D., Gambi, F., Tartaro, A., et al. (2012). Macrostructural Alterations of

Subcortical Grey Matter in Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction. PLoS ONE 7, 6: e39118.

5 Angres, D. H. and Bettinardi-Angres, K. (2008). The Disease of Addiction: Origins, Treatment, and Recovery.

Disease-a-Month 54: 696–721; Zillmann, D. (2000). Influence of Unrestrained Access to Erotica on Adolescents’

and Young Adults’ Dispositions Toward Sexuality. Journal of Adolescent Health 27, 2: 41–44.

6 Flisher, C. (2010). Getting Plugged In: An Overview of Internet Addiction. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health

46: 557–9; Layden, M. A. (2010). Pornography and Violence: A New look at the Research. In J. Stoner and D.

Hughes (Eds.) The Social Costs of Pornography: A Collection of Papers (pp. 57–68). Princeton, NJ: Witherspoon

Institute; Paul, P. (2007). Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our

Families. New York: Henry Hold and Co., 82; Kafka, M. P. (2000). The Paraphilia-Related Disorders:

Nonparaphilic Hypersexuality and Sexual Compulsivity/Addiction. In S. R. Leiblum and R. C. Rosen (Eds.)

Principles and Practice of Sex Therapy, 3rd Ed. (pp. 471–503). New York: Guilford Press.

7 Laird, R. D., Marrero, M. D., Melching, J. A., and Kuhn, E. S. (2013). Information Management Strategies in

Early Adolescence: Developmental Change in Use and Transactional Associations with Psychological Adjustment.

Developmental Psychology 49, 5: 928–937; Luoma, J. B., Nobles, R. H., Drake, C. E., Hayes, S. C., O’Hair, A.,

Fletcher, L., and Kohlenberg, B. S. (2013). Self-Stigma in Substance Abuse: Development of a New Measure.

Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment 35: 223–234; Rotenberg, K. J., Bharathi, C., Davies, H.,

and Finch, T. (2013). Bulimic Symptoms and the Social Withdrawal Syndrome. Eating Behaviors 14: 281–284;

Frijns, T. and Finkenauer, C. (2009). Longitudinal Associations Between Keeping a Secret and Psychosocial

Adjustment in Adolescence. International Journal of Behavioral Development 33, 2: 145–154.

8 Flisher, C. (2010). Getting Plugged In: An Overview of Internet Addiction. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health

46: 557–9; Layden, M. A. (2010). Pornography and Violence: A New look at the Research. In J. Stoner and D.

Hughes (Eds.) The Social Costs of Pornography: A Collection of Papers (pp. 57–68). Princeton, NJ: Witherspoon

Institute; Kafka, M. P. (2000). The Paraphilia-Related Disorders: Nonparaphilic Hypersexuality and Sexual

Compulsivity/Addiction. In S. R. Leiblum and R. C. Rosen (Eds.) Principles and Practice of Sex Therapy, 3rd Ed.

(pp. 471–503). New York: Guilford Press.

9 Bridges, Ana J. “Pornography’s Effects on Interpersonal Relationships.” The Social Costs of Pornography: A

Collection of Papers. Ed. Donna M. Hughes and James Reist. Stoner. Princeton, NJ: Witherspoon Institute, 2010.

104-105.

10 Manning J., Senate Testimony 2004, referencing: Dedmon, J., “Is the Internet bad for your marriage? Online

affairs, pornographic sites playing greater role in divorces,” 2002, press release from The Dilenschneider Group, Inc.

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